KEGG   PATHWAY: map04115Help
Entry
map04115                    Pathway                                

Name
p53 signaling pathway
Description
p53 activation is induced by a number of stress signals, including DNA damage, oxidative stress and activated oncogenes. The p53 protein is employed as a transcriptional activator of p53-regulated genes. This results in three major outputs; cell cycle arrest, cellular senescence or apoptosis. Other p53-regulated gene functions communicate with adjacent cells, repair the damaged DNA or set up positive and negative feedback loops that enhance or attenuate the functions of the p53 protein and integrate these stress responses with other signal transduction pathways.
Class
Cellular Processes; Cell growth and death
BRITE hierarchy
Pathway map
map04115  p53 signaling pathway
map04115

Ortholog table
Disease
H00409  Type 2 diabetes mellitus
H00881  Li-Fraumeni syndrome
H00896  Lymphangioleiomyomatosis
H00915  Tuberous sclerosis complex
H00992  Seckel syndrome
H01007  Choroid plexus papilloma
H01106  Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 deficiency
H01195  VACTERL/VATER association
Reference
  Authors
Levine AJ, Hu W, Feng Z.
  Title
The P53 pathway: what questions remain to be explored?
  Journal
Cell Death Differ 13:1027-36 (2006)
DOI:10.1038/sj.cdd.4401910
Reference
  Authors
Harris SL, Levine AJ.
  Title
The p53 pathway: positive and negative feedback loops.
  Journal
Oncogene 24:2899-908 (2005)
DOI:10.1038/sj.onc.1208615
Reference
  Authors
Balint E E, Vousden KH.
  Title
Activation and activities of the p53 tumour suppressor protein.
  Journal
Br J Cancer 85:1813-23 (2001)
DOI:10.1054/bjoc.2001.2128
Reference
  Authors
Taylor WR, Stark GR.
  Title
Regulation of the G2/M transition by p53.
  Journal
Oncogene 20:1803-15 (2001)
DOI:10.1038/sj.onc.1204252
Reference
  Authors
Hofseth LJ, Hussain SP, Harris CC.
  Title
p53: 25 years after its discovery.
  Journal
Trends Pharmacol Sci 25:177-81 (2004)
DOI:10.1016/j.tips.2004.02.009
Reference
  Authors
Pietenpol JA, Stewart ZA.
  Title
Cell cycle checkpoint signaling: cell cycle arrest versus apoptosis.
  Journal
Toxicology 181-182:475-81 (2002)
DOI:10.1016/S0300-483X(02)00460-2
Reference
  Authors
Tokino T, Nakamura Y.
  Title
The role of p53-target genes in human cancer.
  Journal
Crit Rev Oncol Hematol 33:1-6 (2000)
DOI:10.1016/S1040-8428(99)00051-7
Reference
  Authors
Hermeking H, Benzinger A.
  Title
14-3-3 proteins in cell cycle regulation.
  Journal
Semin Cancer Biol 16:183-92 (2006)
DOI:10.1016/j.semcancer.2006.03.002
Reference
  Authors
Sherr CJ.
  Title
Divorcing ARF and p53: an unsettled case.
  Journal
Nat Rev Cancer 6:663-73 (2006)
DOI:10.1038/nrc1954
Reference
  Authors
Feng Z, Hu W, de Stanchina E, Teresky AK, Jin S, Lowe S, Levine AJ.
  Title
The regulation of AMPK beta1, TSC2, and PTEN expression by p53: stress, cell and tissue specificity, and the role of these gene products in modulating the IGF-1-AKT-mTOR pathways.
  Journal
Cancer Res 67:3043-53 (2007)
DOI:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-06-4149
Reference
  Authors
Resnick-Silverman L, Manfredi JJ
  Title
Two Faces of SIVA.
  Journal
Cancer Discov 5:581-3 (2015)
DOI:10.1158/2159-8290.CD-15-0484
Reference
  Authors
Resch U, Schichl YM, Winsauer G, Gudi R, Prasad K, de Martin R
  Title
Siva1 is a XIAP-interacting protein that balances NFkappaB and JNK signalling to promote apoptosis.
  Journal
J Cell Sci 122:2651-61 (2009)
DOI:10.1242/jcs.049940
Reference
  Authors
Barkinge JL, Gudi R, Sarah H, Chu F, Borthakur A, Prabhakar BS, Prasad KV
  Title
The p53-induced Siva-1 plays a significant role in cisplatin-mediated apoptosis.
  Journal
J Carcinog 8:2 (2009)
DOI:10.4103/1477-3163.45389
Reference
  Authors
Ohiro Y, Garkavtsev I, Kobayashi S, Sreekumar KR, Nantz R, Higashikubo BT, Duffy SL, Higashikubo R, Usheva A, Gius D, Kley N, Horikoshi N
  Title
A novel p53-inducible apoptogenic gene, PRG3, encodes a homologue of the apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF).
  Journal
FEBS Lett 524:163-71 (2002)
DOI:10.1016/S0014-5793(02)03049-1
KO pathway
ko04115   

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