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Entry
map04540                    Pathway                                

Name
Gap junction
Description
Gap junctions contain intercellular channels that allow direct communication between the cytosolic compartments of adjacent cells. Each gap junction channel is formed by docking of two 'hemichannels', each containing six connexins, contributed by each neighboring cell. These channels permit the direct transfer of small molecules including ions, amino acids, nucleotides, second messengers and other metabolites between adjacent cells. Gap junctional communication is essential for many physiological events, including embryonic development, electrical coupling, metabolic transport, apoptosis, and tissue homeostasis. Communication through Gap Junction is sensitive to a variety of stimuli, including changes in the level of intracellular Ca2+, pH, transjunctional applied voltage and phosphorylation/dephosphorylation processes. This figure represents the possible activation routes of different protein kinases involved in Cx43 and Cx36 phosphorylation.
Class
Cellular Processes; Cellular community - eukaryotes
BRITE hierarchy
Pathway map
Gap junction
map04540

All organismsOrtholog table
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H01272  
Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS)
Other DBs
GO: 
Reference
  Authors
Saez JC, Berthoud VM, Branes MC, Martinez AD, Beyer EC.
  Title
Plasma membrane channels formed by connexins: their regulation and functions.
  Journal
Physiol Rev 83:1359-400 (2003)
DOI:10.1152/physrev.00007.2003
Reference
  Authors
Warn-Cramer BJ, Lau AF.
  Title
Regulation of gap junctions by tyrosine protein kinases.
  Journal
Biochim Biophys Acta 1662:81-95 (2004)
DOI:10.1016/j.bbamem.2003.10.018
Reference
PMID:9535909
  Authors
Warn-Cramer BJ, Cottrell GT, Burt JM, Lau AF.
  Title
Regulation of connexin-43 gap junctional intercellular communication by mitogen-activated protein kinase.
  Journal
J Biol Chem 273:9188-96 (1998)
DOI:10.1074/jbc.273.15.9188
Reference
  Authors
Roerig B, Feller MB.
  Title
Neurotransmitters and gap junctions in developing neural circuits.
  Journal
Brain Res Brain Res Rev 32:86-114 (2000)
DOI:10.1016/S0165-0173(99)00069-7
Reference
  Authors
Hatton GI.
  Title
Synaptic modulation of neuronal coupling.
  Journal
Cell Biol Int 22:765-80 (1998)
DOI:10.1006/cbir.1998.0386
Reference
  Authors
Cruciani V, Mikalsen SO.
  Title
Connexins, gap junctional intercellular communication and kinases.
  Journal
Biol Cell 94:433-43 (2002)
DOI:10.1016/S0248-4900(02)00014-X
Reference
  Authors
Giepmans BN.
  Title
Gap junctions and connexin-interacting proteins.
  Journal
Cardiovasc Res 62:233-45 (2004)
DOI:10.1016/j.cardiores.2003.12.009
Reference
  Authors
Laird DW.
  Title
Connexin phosphorylation as a regulatory event linked to gap junction internalization and degradation.
  Journal
Biochim Biophys Acta 1711:172-82 (2005)
DOI:10.1016/j.bbamem.2004.09.009
Reference
  Authors
Peracchia C.
  Title
Chemical gating of gap junction channels; roles of calcium, pH and calmodulin.
  Journal
Biochim Biophys Acta 1662:61-80 (2004)
DOI:10.1016/j.bbamem.2003.10.020
Reference
  Authors
Bukauskas FF, Verselis VK.
  Title
Gap junction channel gating.
  Journal
Biochim Biophys Acta 1662:42-60 (2004)
DOI:10.1016/j.bbamem.2004.01.008
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